Tag Results

Easton selectmen hear passionate pleas to save parcel

With five options on the table for what is to become of the former Running Brook Farm on South Park Avenue, the Board of Selectmen appears to be favoring selling the land to Sacred Heart University for athletic facilities, including a pool and tennis courts that residents could use, according to a story in The Easton Courier.

Prayer Center future debated

Easton Courier Photo

The future of the prayer center parcel on South Park Avenue in Easton, near the Mill River, will be the subject of multiple meetings this week.

Easton bought the former Running Brook Farm, a 29-acre property on South Park Avenue, in 2008 for $6.1 million.property after approval at referendum to protect it against dense housing development. It is zoned for three-acre single-family homes.

Click here to read more.

 

Jewish Home wants to buy South Park site

Longtime Easton neighbor the Jewish Home for the Elderly in Fairfield is offering $6.1 million to the town for the former Running Brook Farm, a 29-acre property on South Park Avenue the town bought in 2008 for $6.1 million.

The idea calls for 260 units total, with 200 independent living apartments and a mix of assisted living and skilled nursing spaces. Ten percent of the rental apartments would be reserved for the affordable housing category and would count toward the town’s requirements to provide affordable housing, Banoff said.

Click here to read the full story in The Easton Courier.

Easton deliberates future of Prayer Center site

Easton officials are discussing what to do with the Prayer Center, which abuts the Mill River. (Easton Courier Photo)
Easton could make creative use of the South Park property, abutting the Mill River, by leasing it to farmers, one of about 50 residents who attended an informational session members of the Board of Selectmen.

The property is in the news because the New England Prayer Center has until Oct. 8 to exercise an option to buy the property for $5.8 million. If the group does not buy the property, the town is looking for ideas on what to do with it.

The town bought the property to protect it against dense housing development. It is zoned for three-acre single family homes.

To read The Easton Courier story, click here.